Art against racism: seven charity initiatives

From Takashi Murakami prints to a photo-journey through the London suburb of Southall

One of Richie Shazam’s images of the Black Trans Lives Matter march in Brooklyn, on sale in Magnum’s flash sale at $100
One of Richie Shazam’s images of the Black Trans Lives Matter march in Brooklyn, on sale in Magnum’s flash sale at $100

The Magnum Square Print Sale

What does solidarity look like? Perhaps it’s Harry Gruyaert’s photograph of fishermen working together in a storm. Or Richie Shazam’s images of the recent Black Trans Lives Matter march in Brooklyn. Each of the more than 100 images in Magnum’s flash sale – created in collaboration with Vogue – offer a different meditation on the meaning of “solidarity”. Each 15cm square print is priced at $100 and 50 per cent of proceeds will go to the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), which has been working to eliminate race-based discrimination in the US since 1909. Until 2 August; shop.magnumphotos.com

Translation 2 by Jack Coulter
Translation 2 by Jack Coulter | Image: Jack Coulter
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Jack Coulter

On 25 May, when George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis, Irish artist Jack Coulter was working on a new series of works for the Black Eyed Peas. The American band’s new album, Translation, was interpreted as three colourful abstract paintings by Coulter, whose synesthesia enables him to see sound in colour. Fittingly, the artworks are now being auctioned to raise funds for US racial justice charity Color of Change, and are each expected to fetch up to $20,000. Until 28 July; charitybuzz.com

Anti-Racism Photography Fundraiser

Martin Parr, Wolfgang Tillmans, Alec Soth and Maisie Cousins are among the 100-plus photographers who have contributed archive prints to this charity sale, which runs till 24 July. All prints are £100 and all profits will be directed towards British charities that support the black community: The Black Curriculum, Black Minds Matter and Exist Loudly, which supports young black queer people in London. antiracismphotofundraiser.com

Untitled by Renell Medrano (2018), from Anti-Racism Photography Fundraiser
Untitled by Renell Medrano (2018), from Anti-Racism Photography Fundraiser | Image: Renell Medrano
Black Love by Emmanuel Sanchez Monsalve
Black Love by Emmanuel Sanchez Monsalve | Image: Emmanuel Sanchez Monsalve

My Queer Blackness, My Black Queerness

“As a young, gay, black boy growing up in Jamaica, my perception of pride was always classic, American and whitewashed,” says Jordan Anderson, co-curator of new online initiative My Queer Blackness, My Black Queerness – a three-week happening combining film screenings with a digital journal and a print sale featuring the work of photographers such as Tim Walker and Campbell Addy. “We want to create a virtual space to own the multiple facets of ourselves, to own being black and gay, or black and trans, or black and non-binary. It’s not about getting the approval of anyone else, but more about turning down the noise of naysayers and dancing to the beat of our own existences.” Proceeds from the print sale will go to charities supporting black trans men and women. mqbmbq.com

Takashi Murakami

The latest work from the Japanese artist is a series of limited-edition screenprints that feature his iconic flower and skull motifs, but replace his usual acid-bright hues with a nearly all-black palette. Inspired by Black Lives Matter, each of Murakami’s prints will be available in editions of 300 via the NTWRK app from the second week of July. All proceeds will go to US-based organisations campaigning for racial justice and social equality, including Black Lives Matter, the Equal Justice Initiative and Color of Change. “I have said that the role of an artist is to discern the present and express it for the future audience,” said Murakami. “But if my art can effect any change here and now, I want to contribute it – not only to give back but to give power to the black community plagued by racial injustice.” Prices have yet to be confirmed, but whispers suggest the prints could raise over $1m. thentwrk.com

Untitled 1 by Takashi Murakami, one of the limited-edition screenprints the artist has produced inspired by Black Lives Matter
Untitled 1 by Takashi Murakami, one of the limited-edition screenprints the artist has produced inspired by Black Lives Matter | Image: © TMKK For Black Lives Matter
Sentinel IV by Simone Leigh (2020), on sale in an edition of 25 at Hauser & Wirth, from $25,000
Sentinel IV by Simone Leigh (2020), on sale in an edition of 25 at Hauser & Wirth, from $25,000

Simone Leigh

The Chicago-born sculptor’s work is characterised by sinuous, bodily shapes that reference African-American artworks and objects. Leigh has just announced that all proceeds from her new work – a cast bronze sculpture titled Sentinel IV, available in an edition of 25 for $25,000 from Hauser & Wirth – will go to US-based charity Color of Change. “Simone’s work makes visible and palpable the subjectivity of black women, whose experiences and leadership have always been central to struggles for liberation nationally and globally,” says Rashad Robinson, president of Color of Change. “These incredible new works show the central role of artists in advancing justice.” hauserwirth.com

Priya Ahluwalia

“It’s about community and what it means to be a mixed-heritage person living in Britain,” says 27-year-old designer Priya Ahluwalia of her second book, Jalebi, and the accompanying digital exhibition. Ahluwalia, who was born in London to Nigerian and Punjabi parents, spent 18 months documenting the London suburb of Southall – home to the city’s largest Sikh community and a place the designer spent time while growing up – with photographer Laurence Ellis. The end project showcases, says Ahluwalia, “the beauty of diversity and how immigration enriches lives”. All profits will benefit the Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust and Southall Black Sisters. ahluwaliastudio.com

Priya Ahluwalia, who was born in London to Nigerian and Punjabi parents, spent 18 months documenting the London suburb of Southall
Priya Ahluwalia, who was born in London to Nigerian and Punjabi parents, spent 18 months documenting the London suburb of Southall | Image: Chameleon Visual, Laurence Ellis and Ahluwalia
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